david edward allen
work
texts


- 4-track -

Akira Ikeda Gallery, Berlin, Germany 05.06.2009 – 29.08.2009

4-track – recording (audio extract)

"Saint Michael´s ghost at the battle of Sperenberg" - Laser print 60 x 65 cm stick of explosive recording the explosion
Installation view, photo Marcus Schneider, courtesy Akira Ikeda gallery Installation view, photo Marcus Schneider, courtesy Akira Ikeda gallery Installation view, photo Marcus Schneider, courtesy Akira Ikeda gallery
"5.9788 seconds" Inkjet print on paper, 200 x 350 cm. - photo Marcus Schneider, courtesy Akira Ikeda gallery "Saint Michael´s ghost at the battle of Sperenberg" - photo Marcus Schneider, courtesy Akira Ikeda gallery "Ruler for the speed and duration of a sound wave produced by an explosion" - photo Marcus Schneider, courtesy Akira Ikeda gallery
detail - "Ruler for the speed and duration of a sound wave produced by an explosion" - photo Marcus Schneider, courtesy Akira Ikeda gallery Installation view, photo Marcus Schneider, courtesy Akira Ikeda gallery "4-track" - photo Marcus Schneider, courtesy Akira Ikeda gallery
"4-track" - photo Marcus Schneider, courtesy Akira Ikeda gallery "4-track" - photo Marcus Schneider, courtesy Akira Ikeda ga "4-track" - photo Marcus Schneider, courtesy Akira Ikeda gallery
Installation view, photo Marcus Schneider, courtesy Akira Ikeda gallery "Diagram-Bang!", pencil on paper 50 x 65cm - photo Marcus Schneider, courtesy Akira Ikeda gallery "Saint Michael´s ghost at the battle of Sperenberg" - Laser print 60 x 65 cm

Using dynamite a loud explosion was produced and consequently recorded as it moved over the distance of one Kilometer along the runway at the ex-soviet airbase Sperenberg, near Berlin. The Sound travelled away from its source and along a line of four successive microphones which in just under three seconds recorded the movement of the wave. The work desired to capture a moment in time, and to experience the repetition of this moment through space. For the exhibition, amongst other works, an Anechoic chamber was built to contain the recording which was played at 1 minute intervals on a continuous loop.